Ha an awesome solo adventure today! Went to Pagan Pride Austin at Zilker park. Pictures are of us playing cougars and oxen, a little game to remind us that we cannot all be hunters, and that natures resources are finite.

Some cool street art and my fave ffood in the whole world ffor lunch.
Spent the afternoon at Epoch writing, went for a long walk after dark, then took my favorite drive home.

Good day I say! Very good day. Now I’m going to draw and watch Netflix before bed.

Stay fabulous my fillies!

terezi-tiesrope:

Lace Crowns — Quick Microwave Method 
makes ONE 18” crown
 

1/2 yard crocheted lace

  • (Also look for “Cluny Lace” or “Dyeable Cotton Lace”.  You can find the lace I used for these crowns HERE)
  • Fabric Stiffener (I used Aleene’s Stiffen Quick) 
  • Small bowl
  • Tacky Glue
  • 1 sheet posterboard
  • scissors
  • clear packing tape
  • paper plate or parchment paper
  • thin butterknife or offset spatula
  • sewing pin
  • Gold or silver metallic paint**
  • Rubber gloves
  • Paint brush
  • Hot glue gun or a jewelry adhesive (I used Aleene’s Platinum Bond Glass & Bead) 
  • Vintage jewelry, rhinestones, jeweled scrapbook trim, etc…

Step 1:  Place lace in a small bowl and cover with fabric stiffener.  Soak for 15 minutes.

Step 2:  While lace is soaking, prepare a crown form by cutting a 20” x 4” strip of posterboard.  If using a smaller piece, cut two 10.5” x 4” pieces.  Overlap by a 1/2” and tape together on the front and back.

Step 3:  Roll the posterboard in to a tube, 17.5” in circumference, and secure with packing tape.

Step 4: Remove lace from bowl, allowing excess to gently drip back in to the bowl.  Return excess stiffener to the original bottle.  Wrap the wet lace around the base of the posterboard form.  I used a spot of tacky glue to hold the overlapping ends of the lace together.

Step 5:  Put crown and form on a paper plate or piece of parchment.  Microwave on high power for 30 seconds.  There may be some crackling sounds in this initial phase. Continue to microwave in 30 second increments (depending on the power of your microwave, you might be able to go up to a max of 1 minute increments), until the lace is dry to the touch.
 
Step 6:  Remove plate from microwave and completely spray the crown (while still on the form) with stiffener.  Return to microwave and microwave in short increments till it is dry to the touch.
 
Step 7:  Repeat the process of spraying and drying until you’ve achieved the desired level of stiffness.  For me, I found that 7 spray/dry cycles was sufficient.
 
Step 8:  Remove crown from the form.  You may need to slide a butterknife or offset spatula underneath to help loosen it.  If some of the stiffener has closed up some of the holes in the lace, you can easily clean it out with the end of a pin.
Step 9:  Return the crown to the plate and microwave for an additional 30 seconds to a minute.  When removed from microwave, crown should be completely dry and stiff.  Set the crown aside while you set up your paint
 
Step 10:  Wearing rubber gloves to keep your hands clean, paint the crown, inside and out.  Do not be surprised when the crown goes soft with the application of the wet paint.  It will stiffen, harder than ever, when it dries.
Step 11:  Gently slide the wet crown back on to the posterboard form.  Set aside to dry.  You can use a hairdryer to help speed up the process, but DO NOT return the crown to the microwave. 
 
Step 12:  When crown is dry, attach bits of glitz and finery with a hot glue gun or jewelry glue.  I used bits of broken vintage jewelry that I dismantled with the help of tin snips.
 

guess who’s making tiny black crowns tomorrow!! bwhahahaah.

I made a blanket.
I should finish cleaning my studio but hey,  at least my sewing machine is set back up aand. Now this fabric identify hanging around. . 
Can’t see it but all the stitching is rainbow gradient thread.

I made a blanket.
I should finish cleaning my studio but hey, at least my sewing machine is set back up aand. Now this fabric identify hanging around. .
Can’t see it but all the stitching is rainbow gradient thread.

Even if what you’re working on doesn’t go anywhere, it will help you with the next thing you’re doing. Make yourself available for something to happen. Give it a shot.
What are the rules about cosplay contest reguarding buying an element of a cosplay?

The rules for MOST conventions is 75% of the items you’re wearing must be made by you, but that changes from convention to convention. it’s always best to point out what you DID NOT make to judges during prejudging and let them decied.
For me as a judge, it simply means I don’t count that piece into your overall score. I simply judge your costume as if you didn’t have it at all, but i don’t hold it against you for not making it. Basically I’m only judging the parts you DID make.
For example, I did NOT make my Seras wig! That was cute and styled by Yellowsubtab and it’s FABULOUS. I make sure the judges are always aware of that fact.

I love my job but it weird sometimes lol.

My face when people say mean things about my cosplay:

Fools! Your hate only make me stronger!

zabossu:

I find it hilarious how dudebros gamers will complain all day about how they think women cosplay characters in skimpy outfits to get their attention, but they don’t think anything of how gaming companies use these female characters to get their attention and coax them into buying their games.

ask-showstopper:

Last set of Photos here. Also, read the caption of the last photo. ;)

Feat: ask-showstopper, askponychell, and asksolofire

Nightmare Rarity & Earthbound the Pegasus guard Set I

Photography and post by the ever so amazing and talented Senia Vera Photography
Brony Fan Fair 2014, Austin Texas
All costumes, props and armor build by us!  Colony Drop Cosplay

These costumes! you guys. They look exactly like the design sketches. I’m so incredibly proud of the work we did on these! I hope you enjoy them as much as we do. There is a downside, I can’t sit down at all. My skirt is made of metal >.> It’s a bit sad that you can’t really see the skirt lights full effect, but we’re going to do some low light photos here real soon to show off more!

The only full body shot I’ve found yet of our new pony cosplays!  Earthbound the guard Pegasus and Nightmare Rarity.

The only full body shot I’ve found yet of our new pony cosplays! Earthbound the guard Pegasus and Nightmare Rarity.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

someguyinasuit:

Cosplay 2

and the back of my head is in every single picture. My stool was so tall I couldn’t even reach the judges table.